Tag Archives: realism

Morse Pond Review: This Would Make a Good Story Someday

9781101938171This Would Make A Good  Story Someday

Dana Alison Levy

Random House Children’s Books

$16.99

Available Now

 

This Would Make A Good Story Someday is a amazing story about a girl named Sara, who has to survive a long family road trip with her two moms, her younger sister nicknamed Ladybug, and her older sister Laurel. At first she is frustrated that she has to go, but along the way she learns what it means to be a true family. She meets friends that she knows she will remember for a long time. Along the way she attempts to reinvent herself, but learns how to accept who she truly is. This is an incredible book that I would definitely recommend to many people.

~ Jane, age 11

 

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Morse Pond Review: Finding Perfect

9780374303129Finding Perfect

Elly Swartz

Farrar Straus Giroux

$16.99

Available Now

 

Molly Nathans is a twelve-year-old girl who must have everything perfect. After her parents split, her mom’s new job is forcing her to move to Canada, for a whole year, or more. Molly life is comprised of a plan to bring her mom home, while she struggles with her OCD disorder that is slowly obtaining all of her attention. Will Molly’s plan work? Will she find a way to handle her new and old obsession? Join Molly on her journey to see if she is really crazy, or is she just telling  herself this. Finding Perfect is now my favorite book of all time! Everyone should read it!

~ Bella, grade 6

 

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Morse Pond Review: Finding Perfect

9780374303129Finding Perfect

Elly Swartz

Available now

Farrar Straus Giroux

$16.99

 

Molly needs everything perfect. It is getting harder and harder every day. Her mom left and she has an idea to get her back.This is a book that gets better and better with every page. Once you start it you, will not want to stop. I would rate it 6 out of 5 stars. If I were you, I would grab this book before it becomes hard to get a copy.

 

Christian, Grade 6, Age 11

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Morse Pond Review: Lights, Camera, Disaster

 

9781338134087Lights, Camera, Disaster

Erin M. Dionne

Arthur A. Levine Books

$16.99

Available March 27, 2018

Lights, Camera, Disaster is about a girl named Hester Greene who has severe ADHD and anxiety. Hess loves making movies. When she has her camera in-hand she can make decisions, and be organized. But with her disorders, doing things that other students would find easy, come extremely hard to her.

Hess has to save her language arts grade or else she won’t be able to pass the eighth grade. If she can’t bring up her grade, she will not be able to move up to high school.

Coming from a kid that has ADHD and Severe Anxiety, Hester Greene is one of the most relatable book characters ever created. I give Lights Camera Disaster a five-star-review. This book is a must-read for anyone who is struggling with conditions like Hess.

~ Merritt, 6th grade

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Morse Pond Review: Kyle Finds Her Way

9780545852661Kyle Finds Her Way

Susie Salom

Arthur A. Levine Books

$16.99

Available now

 

Kyle Finds Her Way is a great book. I would give this book four stars. Susie Salom  gives lots of detail.  Kyle is a great character because she sticks up for her friends. I liked the part when Kyle has to join the school NAVS team ( a problem-solving competitive group that competes)  and has to make it work. I couldn’t put the book down.  This is a book for people who like realistic fiction.  I encourage people who like those books to read it.

~Emma, age 10

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Staff Review: Fans of the Impossible Life

9780062331755

Fans of the Impossible Life     

Kate Scelsa

Balzer & Bray/Harperteen

$17.99

Available: September 8th, 2015

Kate Scelsa’s Fans of the Impossible Life features the trials and tribulations of three misfit high school friends that form an unbreakable bond and become fans of the impossible fantasy filled life. I think of high school in this way: in every school you have different types of clans of students, such as the Preps, the rebels, the sporty people, the popular ones, and the not so visible shy, standoffish, wallflower ones like Jeremy, to whom I can relate. Then you have the people like Mira a.k.a Miranda, the uniquely different ones. The ones that aren’t afraid of standing out and wearing what they want to wear, and being who they truly are, the ones that struggle with reality. The ones that try to fill the empty problem filled gaps with material items. Finally, you have the rebels – or clanless ones – like Sebby a.k.a Sebastian, who don’t even attempt to go to school or have any kind of succession in life, and sort of just wander and do their own thing. The ones that come from chaotic households, feeling as though they don’t have a place.

The more I leaned about each character, and the more puzzle pieces I could fit together about who each of these characters were individually and their story, the more I found myself relating to Mira, Sebby and Jeremy. I could not put the book down and wanted to follow these characters and jump into their world and see what it was all about and experience it, I wanted to know where their stories would lead them.  I can, and I bet many other readers can appreciate the realism of the book and how Mire, Sebby and Jeremy are just typical everyday people living the day to life, somehow surviving and carrying on despite each of their internal/ external problems. Most readers will be able to relate to this book, and possibly form connections with these characters like I have, which I think is very important to the reader’s liking and understanding of the book.

Could I see this book possibly becoming a movie in the near future? Absolutely! I would probably see it the day it premiered. I would recommend this book to practically anyone, but I really do think this book’s target audience is the typical teenager/ young adult living the typical life, going through problems, but who really just want an outlet. I can guarantee that many young adults and teenagers have some form of degree of the problems that Mira, Sebby, and Jeremy do within the mythical character world. Mira, Sebby, and Jeremy prove that you can survive whatever it is you are going through and you will get through it.  I can really appreciate the way Scelsa gives each character an individual voice. It’s almost like one on one time between the character and the reader. Getting to know the character and form connections. I also love how Scelsa gradually starts revealing more and more clues and tiny pieces that you can fit together.  The slow reveal keeps the reader interested, in tune within the book, and wondering “What else am I going to learn about Mira, Sebby or Jeremy, What crazy things will they do next?  What’s going to happen next to them?”

The more I read The Fans of the Impossible Life, the more I found myself wishing these characters were actually human beings so I could befriend them and call them up anytime I wanted. which is what every book should be able to do. If anyone I came across asked me whether The Fans of the Impossible Life is a good book and whether they should read it, I would say absolutely, “Yes, you should” because this book is the perfect example of realism; it is raw and real and directly addresses the issue between people struggling between reality and wanting to live the impossible life. Fans of the Impossible Life should definitely be at the top of anyone’s TBR list.

~ Eryn,16

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Morse Pond Review: Paper Things

9780763663230Paper Things

Jennifer Richard Jacobson

Candlewick

$16.99

Available February 2015

Paper Things, by Jennifer Richard Jacobson, is a really enjoyable book because the characters seem real. The plot and setting is well planned. Ari and her older brother, Gage, leave their guardian’s home. They have nowhere to stay, and they keep traveling to friend’s houses to stay overnight. Meanwhile, Ari’s grades are going down and it gets harder and harder to keep her friends. Ari has two choices, either she can stay with Gage, or she can go back to Janna, their old guardian. Which one should she choose? Paper Things, is an intriguing book, that I would recommend.

~ Grace, age 10

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,