Tag Archives: Eight Cousins Bookstore

Morse Pond Review: The Capybara Conspiracy

the-capybara-conspiracyThe Capybara Conspiracy

Erica S. Pearl

Random House Children’s Books

$16.99

Available Now

 

 

This book is full of thrilling action and suspenseful excitement. There are creative characters and backstabbing traitors. Farley Middle School has an amazing mascot that is being plotted against by three harmless children. Those children are not jocks but they think that if they steal the mascot and then give it back like they didn’t steal it they will be able to get what they really want. There is a backfire in the system named Pablo.  I really enjoyed this book told in play format!

~Gideon, grade 5, age 10

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Morse Pond Review: Fish in a Tree

fishinatreeFish In A Tree

Lynda Mullaly Hunt

Penguin Young Readers Group

$16.99

Available Now

 

Fish In A Tree is an incredible book about a girl who has one unbelievable challenge she has to get through. Ally Nickerson has a case of unidentified dyslexia. She had to make it to 5th grade without anyone even noticing. When her original 5th grade teacher has a baby, a permanent substitute named Mr.Daniels comes. He is the only teacher that realizes that Ally isn’t dumb, she is just different. This book is full of sadness, hope, and even some happiness. If you liked One For The Murphys, or Out Of My Mind you will love this book too. I am really glad that I came across this book. It turned out to be one of my favorite books.

~ Jane, age 10, grade 5   

 

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Morse Pond Review: Dog Man

Dog dog-manMan

Dav Pilkey

Scholastic

$9.99

Available now

 

I really enjoyed this book because it made me laugh a lot. The main character is a good guy who is trying to protect the community from an evil cat. This graphic novel, by the author of the Captain Underpants series, is great!

~ Quinn, grade 5

 

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Morse Pond Review: Moo

MooMoo

Sharon Creech

HarperCollins

$16.99

Available August 30, 2016

That stubborn Zora! Reena and Luke are the new kids on the block when they must take care of creepy Mrs. Falala’s (Fuh-LAH-lah) cow, Zora. Teaching a belted galloway (like Zora) to become a show cow takes a lot of hard work, and the whole-hearted Maine boy Zep is happy to help out. Between Luke teaching how to draw, and Reena making a new friend, this book shows you that new experiences are an amazing opportunity to change your life, you just have to have the courage to try.

You will NOT be able to put this book down as soon as you read the first sentence.

~ Ava, grade 6

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Staff Review: The Girl from Everywhere

 

the girl from everywhereThe Girl From Everywhere

Heidi Heilig

Greenwillow Books

$17.99

Available February 2016

For those of you seeking one roller-coaster of an adventure without leaving your chair, then The Girl From Everywhere written by Heidi Heilig is the book for you. Once I started to read the book, it became impossible to put it down. This story focuses on a sixteen year old girl named Nixie or Nix for short: a girl born in Honolulu, Hawaii in 1868. A girl who since then has been sailing around the world on a ship with her father and various other crew members, from century to century, country to country. The setting of them traveling around on one huge ship from sea to sea has that whole Pirates of a Caribbean kind of feel. On the way they collect numerous exotic species, one of them being a rare bird that Nix manages to steal from a bird keeper in India, that has the power to cure any illness by simply looking the sick person in the eye.

Nix’s father sees her as nothing but bait. He will use her to get whatever he needs, wherever he needs, no matter how dangerous the situation may be. His main objective is to get back to 1868 Honolulu Hawaii where the story all began, to reunite with the love of his life before she died giving birth to Nix. Unfortunately, the future won’t look bright for Nix if she does help her father. Instead it will cost Nix her own life.

~Eryn, 16

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Morse Pond Review: The Last Fifth Grade of Emerson Elementary

The Last Fifth Grade of Emerson ElementaryThe Last Fifth Grade of Emerson Elementary

Laura Shovan

Wendy Lamb Books

$15.99

Available April 12, 2015

The Last Fifth Grade of Emerson Elementary is a window into what it feels like when a place you love might get torn down. But the fifth graders in Ms. Hill’s class are not going to let that happen. Each character has a unique personality. Humorous and poetic, this book really shows what it means to stand up and have school spirit. My favorite character in the story is Sydney. I like that she was a little bit tomboyish and girly at the same time. My favorite part is when Shoshanna stood up for herself and tells Hannah Wiles she is not going to be her servant anymore. I really liked this book and I hope Laura Shovan will continue writing poetry.
~ Josephine, age 11

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Customer review: The Dead House by Dawn Kurtagich

dead houseThe Dead House

Dawn Kurtagich

Little, Brown Books for Young Readers,

$18.00

Available: September 15th, 2015

I really enjoyed this book. It was an interesting and unusual mix of psychological thriller and dark fantasy, and it was more than suspenseful enough to keep me reading. The format, which consisted of captioned video footage, newspaper clippings, and excerpts from the main character’s diary, was cleverly done in that it told the whole story without the need for much added explanation. Though pretty open-ended, the conclusion answered the story’s important questions in a way that made sense; something a lot of thrillers struggle to do. I would recommend this book for kids age 14 and up, as there is violence and some sexual themes.

Jason ~18

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Customer Review: A Thousand Nights by E.K. Johnston

a thousand nights A Thousand Nights

Emily Kate Johnston

Disney-Hyperion

$18.99

Available: October 6th, 2015

A Thousand Nights by E.K. Johnston transports readers to Arabian deserts, where readers can feel the burning sand under their feet and the hot sun beating on their backs.  A nameless girl saves her sister from being taken by Lo-Melkhiin, who has married three hundred women and has killed them. The girl instead sacrifices herself to be taken. Fans of Arabian Nights will fly through this book.

~ Emily, 17

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Customer review: Damage Done by Amanda Panitch

damage doneDamage Done

Amanda Panitch

Random House Books for Young Readers

$17.99

Available now

Damage Done by Amanda Panitch is one of the best mystery thrillers I have read of the YA variety.  Julia Vann had the perfect life, then the shooting happened. The next moment she is a new person, lives in a new town, and doesn’t have a brother. You have to read the book to find out what really happened in the band room, where it all started.  Perfect for fans of Gillian Flynn, and anyone who loves a good plot twist.

Emily ~ 17

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Staff review: To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

TKAMTo Kill A Mockingbird

Harper Lee

HarperCollins Publishers

$16.99

Available Now

The novel To Kill A Mockingbird, written by Harper Lee, is a classic because the values and morals displayed through out this novel will never grow old. Translated into more than forty languages, this novel transcends the American canon. To Kill a Mockingbird takes place in Maycomb County, in southern Alabama, and is told from the innocent eyes of six-year-old Scout Finch, a tomboy/rebel, who is the daughter of Atticus Finch, an open minded lawyer with good values and morals. Atticus agrees to represent Tom Robinson, a black man accused of rape. In To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus isn’t one to judge man by his skin color and race but rather focuses on the content of their character and who they are as a person.

To Kill a Mockingbird teaches the reader this important lesson: that you shouldn’t judge others based on appearances or what you’ve heard “until you consider things from his point of view […] until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” For example, Scout has encounters with many people who defy stereotypes such as Boo Radley. The story also circles around the important moral that everyone is created equal and that, as Atticus states, “whenever a white man does that to a black man, no matter who he is, how rich he is, or how fine a family he comes from, that white man is trash.” Atticus’s comment implies that character outweighs skin color.

In my freshman year of High School, I read To Kill A Mockingbird for English class. I didn’t think much of it back then nor did I try to put it into context, analyze it, or to try and figure out what it really meant, because I wasn’t into it. Now rereading the novel almost two years later, I gained a lot more knowledge from the nuances of the story and insight into the morals that infuse the novel. I also gained insight into individual characters. I related more to Atticus in my second reading and I value the lessons he teaches Scout about not judging people. Re-reading increased my understanding of why To Kill a Mockingbird is regarded as an American classic.

Eryn~16

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