Tag Archives: 8 cousins

Staff Review: The Girl from Everywhere

 

the girl from everywhereThe Girl From Everywhere

Heidi Heilig

Greenwillow Books

$17.99

Available February 2016

For those of you seeking one roller-coaster of an adventure without leaving your chair, then The Girl From Everywhere written by Heidi Heilig is the book for you. Once I started to read the book, it became impossible to put it down. This story focuses on a sixteen year old girl named Nixie or Nix for short: a girl born in Honolulu, Hawaii in 1868. A girl who since then has been sailing around the world on a ship with her father and various other crew members, from century to century, country to country. The setting of them traveling around on one huge ship from sea to sea has that whole Pirates of a Caribbean kind of feel. On the way they collect numerous exotic species, one of them being a rare bird that Nix manages to steal from a bird keeper in India, that has the power to cure any illness by simply looking the sick person in the eye.

Nix’s father sees her as nothing but bait. He will use her to get whatever he needs, wherever he needs, no matter how dangerous the situation may be. His main objective is to get back to 1868 Honolulu Hawaii where the story all began, to reunite with the love of his life before she died giving birth to Nix. Unfortunately, the future won’t look bright for Nix if she does help her father. Instead it will cost Nix her own life.

~Eryn, 16

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Staff Review: These Shallow Graves

these shallow gravesThese Shallow Graves

Jennifer Donnelly

$19.99

Available October 27th, 2015

Delacorte Press

New York City in the 1800s was a completely different world. It was a time when woman didn’t have the same rights as men. A time when woman weren’t good for anything except getting married right after school and settling down, sitting pretty and doing as they were told — which meant not speaking out of term and staying home and behaving as a proper young woman of society should behave. A girl could never be forgiven for wishing to know things, which doesn’t stop Jo Montfort. Jo wants to know what really happened to her father, Charles Montfort, New York City’s wealthiest man and owner of a newspaper. He accidently shoots himself after cleaning a loaded gun, but Jo Montfort knows her father was way too smart to clean a loaded gun.

Jo is a true rebel at heart with much different dreams. Instead of getting married right after high school to a wealthy bachelor like a young woman is expected to do, she dreams of being a writer: specifically a newspaper reporter like the famous Nellie Bly. Nothing will stop Jo Montfort from finding out the real truth behind her father’s death. If it means breaking and entering into abandoned homes, digging up graves, or lying about where she has been, then so be it.

There’s nothing I like more than a determined, strong minded young rebel like Jo Montfort, breaking out of the very society that ties her down and contradicting and breaking all the rules to follow their dreams and get what they truly want. If you’re interested in mysteries that have you at the edge of your seat then These Shallow Graves written by Jennifer Donnelly is the book for you.

~Eryn, 16

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Customer Review: Kid Athletes: True Stories Of Childhood From Sports Legends

kid athletes  Kid Athletes

David Stabler and Doogie Horner

$13.95

Quirk Books

Available November 2015

Have you ever wondered how kids become award wining athletes? The book Kid Athletes: True Stories of Childhood from Sport’s Legends by David Stabler and Doogie Horner has the answer. This book is filled with exciting tales about stars of hockey, basketball, baseball, tennis, golf, horse racing, gymnastics, and soccer. Your favorite athletes are in this book.

My favorites  were Gabby Douglas, Yao Ming and Lionel Messi. Lionel Messi impressed me the most. He started walking at nine months . From the first second he was persistent . I was amazed that even when he broke his arm he didn’t scream or cry in pain. Her learned how to deal with pain.

Every sports legend was fearless but did not start that way. It was funny to read about the tough NFL quarterback Peyton Manning doing the tango. You will learn how these kids worked hard to accomplish their dreams. I really liked the book and enjoyed the funny illustrations.

~Rosella, Age 9

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Customer Review: Upside Down Magic

upside down magic

Upside Down Magic

Sarah Mlynowski, Lauren Mvrace and Emily Jenkins

$14.99

Scholastic Press

Available September 2015

I loved the book “Upside Down Magic” by Sarah Mlynowski, Lauren Myracle and Emily Jenkins because everyone in the book had an unusual ability. They were a freezer, a kid that turns into a rock, a girl who makes a it rain, a guy who sees invisible sound waves, a girl who scares animals, a kid who is like a balloon, a girl who shrinks things, a little girl who turns not a beaver, not a kitten but bitten and many other combinations. Nory was sent away to live with her aunt. Go to a different school and leave her friends behind.

Nory was different, not able to do regular school assignments. At first Nory was unhappy but she soon realized it was okay to be different at her new school.

I liked the character Bax, a fluxor at Nory’s new school who could turn into objects instead of animals. In the story Bax turned into a rope to help Nory with a problem.

I cant wait for the second book, to find out what happens to Nory.

~ Rosella, age 9

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Display: All Things India

India 6India 4 India 5

 

India 1India 3India 2

The idea of India fascinates me. I learned European history and United States history in High School. World History was tacked on at the end of junior and senior year as kind of an addendum, but it was like a tasting menu of the rest of the world packed into a few months. The idea that all these other cultures had existed and thrived outside of Western culture was mind-boggling.

Indian literature differs from most of the other southeastern Asian literature, maybe because English colonization has given it a slightly European feel. Indian authors often write their novels in English. The first Indian novel that I really remember getting into was A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth, a great big doorstop of a book. It was a great family saga that I couldn’t put down.

Recommended reading:

A Fine Balance and Family Matters by Rohinton Mistry

Red Earth and Pouring Rain and Sacred Games by Vikram Chandra

Memories of Rain by Sunetra Gupta

A House for Mr. Biswas by V. S. Naipaul

Caretaker: A Ranjit Singh Novel by A. X. Ahmad

Last Taxi Ride by A. X. Ahmad

Behind the Beautiful Forever’s: Life, Death and Hope in a Mumbai Under city by Katherine Boo

Wave by Sonali Deraniyagala

Grandma and the Great Gourd: A Bengali Folktale by Chitra Banerjee

Tales from India: Stories of Creation and the Cosmos by Jamila Gavin

Case of the Man Who Died Laughing: A Vish Puri Mysery #1 by Tarquin Hall

Case of the Missing Servant: A Vish Puri Mystery #2 by Tarquin Hall

Case of the Deadly Butter Chicken: A Vish Puri Mystery by Tarquin Hall

Case of the Love Commandos: From the files of Vish Puri, India’s most private investigator by Tarquin Hall

Born Confused by Tanuja Desaia

LowLand by Jhumpa Lahiri

Interpreter of Maladies: Stories by Jhumpa Lahiri

Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri

No Land’s Man by Aasif Mandvi

Monkey: A Trickster Tale from India by Gerald McDermott

Hundred- Foot Journey: A novel by Richard C Morais

Lives of Others by Neel Mukherjee

Midnight’s Children by Salman Rushdie

Family Life: A novel by Akhil Sharma

Space Between Us by Thrity Umrigar

World We Found: A novel by Thrity Umrigar

Story Hour: A novel by Thrity Umrigar

Elephant’s Friend and Other Tales from Ancient India by Marcia Williams

And a link to a great little Buzzfeed site called 34 Books By Indian Authors That Everyone Should Read:  http://www.buzzfeed.com/andreborges/kitaabein

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Staff Review: Fans of the Impossible Life

9780062331755

Fans of the Impossible Life     

Kate Scelsa

Balzer & Bray/Harperteen

$17.99

Available: September 8th, 2015

Kate Scelsa’s Fans of the Impossible Life features the trials and tribulations of three misfit high school friends that form an unbreakable bond and become fans of the impossible fantasy filled life. I think of high school in this way: in every school you have different types of clans of students, such as the Preps, the rebels, the sporty people, the popular ones, and the not so visible shy, standoffish, wallflower ones like Jeremy, to whom I can relate. Then you have the people like Mira a.k.a Miranda, the uniquely different ones. The ones that aren’t afraid of standing out and wearing what they want to wear, and being who they truly are, the ones that struggle with reality. The ones that try to fill the empty problem filled gaps with material items. Finally, you have the rebels – or clanless ones – like Sebby a.k.a Sebastian, who don’t even attempt to go to school or have any kind of succession in life, and sort of just wander and do their own thing. The ones that come from chaotic households, feeling as though they don’t have a place.

The more I leaned about each character, and the more puzzle pieces I could fit together about who each of these characters were individually and their story, the more I found myself relating to Mira, Sebby and Jeremy. I could not put the book down and wanted to follow these characters and jump into their world and see what it was all about and experience it, I wanted to know where their stories would lead them.  I can, and I bet many other readers can appreciate the realism of the book and how Mire, Sebby and Jeremy are just typical everyday people living the day to life, somehow surviving and carrying on despite each of their internal/ external problems. Most readers will be able to relate to this book, and possibly form connections with these characters like I have, which I think is very important to the reader’s liking and understanding of the book.

Could I see this book possibly becoming a movie in the near future? Absolutely! I would probably see it the day it premiered. I would recommend this book to practically anyone, but I really do think this book’s target audience is the typical teenager/ young adult living the typical life, going through problems, but who really just want an outlet. I can guarantee that many young adults and teenagers have some form of degree of the problems that Mira, Sebby, and Jeremy do within the mythical character world. Mira, Sebby, and Jeremy prove that you can survive whatever it is you are going through and you will get through it.  I can really appreciate the way Scelsa gives each character an individual voice. It’s almost like one on one time between the character and the reader. Getting to know the character and form connections. I also love how Scelsa gradually starts revealing more and more clues and tiny pieces that you can fit together.  The slow reveal keeps the reader interested, in tune within the book, and wondering “What else am I going to learn about Mira, Sebby or Jeremy, What crazy things will they do next?  What’s going to happen next to them?”

The more I read The Fans of the Impossible Life, the more I found myself wishing these characters were actually human beings so I could befriend them and call them up anytime I wanted. which is what every book should be able to do. If anyone I came across asked me whether The Fans of the Impossible Life is a good book and whether they should read it, I would say absolutely, “Yes, you should” because this book is the perfect example of realism; it is raw and real and directly addresses the issue between people struggling between reality and wanting to live the impossible life. Fans of the Impossible Life should definitely be at the top of anyone’s TBR list.

~ Eryn,16

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